Films, Books, Musings-With the Glamour of Old Hollywood and the Flair of the Retro

What Would Atticus Do? Lessons from a man of fine character.

In Attitude, Movies on August 11, 2012 at 3:08 pm

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I have just finished watching the movie To Kill A Mockingbird again. I never grow tired of watching it and never lose my awe at how Gregory Peck portrays Atticus Finch. Harper Lee, author of To Kill A Mockingbird agreed,
“In that film, the man and the part met.” Harper Lee

These are some of the life lessons Atticus can teach us:

*Choose your battles with your children and with other people.

*Stand by your beliefs and stand up for what is right.
(On defending Tom Robinson) “For a number of reasons. The main one is that if I didn’t, I couldn’t hold my head up in town. I couldn’t even tell you or Jem not to do somethin’ again.”

*Don’t cause unneccesary embarrassment for others.

*React to anothers’ bad humour with compliments and kindness.

*Tell the truth. Give your children truthful answers when they ask a question.

*Teach your children to respect others, no matter their circumstances, and model that behaviour yourself.

*Be affectionate with your children.

*Read with your children. Read in your leisure time.

*Put yourself in other people’s shoes. Try to see things from their point of view.
” If you just learn a single trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… Until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.”

*Don’t over-react.

*Try not to resort to physical violence.

*Practise eloquence. Have a command of language, speak clearly, passionately, when called for without undue raising of the voice and refrain from profanity.

If only we all could have the noble character and integrity of Atticus Finch. If only all children had the benefit of such a father figure.

What has Atticus taught you?

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  1. Sharon, I like the way you think. And write. We share some similarities on both accounts.

    Just found out my husband’s grandfather was born in Sydney. At a young age the family moved to Hawaii and he and his brother were the first to introduce commercial production of honey & beeswax to the islands.

    On a vintage note, the company was Sandwich Island Honey Company, and the family lived in the Alexander Young Hotel (how destroyed, but photos online are so cool).

    Also found an original 8 x 10 of Robert Louis Stevenson at a Luau w/ the king of Hawaii. RLS’s step daughter Isobel Strong was a friend of my husband’s grandmother and is also in the photo.

    Also, a bookstore that my son has a connection with ordered copies of TWLL based on Amazon reviews. One is really great, the other I think is good, but there is a tinge of “school marm” to the tone.

    If you have time, it would probably help to have your review on Amazon (& Amazon UK)–IF it’s easy enough.

    Obviously I could ask friends to post reviews, but honestly, I would prefer to see reviews come from someone’s personal motivation–rather than my prodding. It seems appropriate given the message of the book.

    Plus, I’m not a pushy, mega-marketing personality. Though I’m having to amp up that part of my brain, which is not so easy w/ the fatigue & unpacking of moving boxes!

    Hope I’m not wearing you out! If you hadn’t lived in Sydney, I still would have been intrigued by your pinterest page and blog. Thought provoking and funny stuff–and I love that combination.

    Rachel

    • Thanks Rachel 🙂 I am kimd of usimg pinterest as a cross between an magazine and a inspiration board. I think I pin things that ‘speak to me’ but I am still conscious it is public and not private.
      I hope the move is going well, I have moved 6 times in 20 years and alwaus try to unpack to quickly and burn out-I know you wouldn’t do that!
      That is so intereting about your husbands’ Sydney connection. I am researching my family tree and the experiences our ancestors went through, especially our early settlers and convicts, is fascinating. It is true that everyone has a story in them! Maybe one day I will ‘borrow’ one or two, like some of our best selling novelists 😉
      I have sent you an email re Amazon etc.
      All the best,
      Sharon

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